Roundup #65: CASPaxos, HealthChecks & Serilog, Fallback Policies, Playwright, F# Path to Relaxation

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Follow @CodeOpinion on Twitter

CASPaxos: Linearizable databases without logs

Recently I’ve been playing around with a new algorithm known as CASPaxos. In this post I’m going to talk about the algorithm and its potential benefits for distributed databases, particularly key-value stores.

Link: https://reubenbond.github.io/posts/caspaxos

Excluding health check endpoints from Serilog request logging

In this post I show how to skip adding the summary log message completely for specific requests. This can be useful when you have an endpoint that is hit a lot, where logging every request is of little value.

Link: https://andrewlock.net/using-serilog-aspnetcore-in-asp-net-core-3-excluding-health-check-endpoints-from-serilog-request-logging/

Globally Require Authenticated Users By Default Using Fallback Policies in ASP.NET Core

You can use Fallback Policies in ASP.NET Core 3.0+ to require an Authenticated User by default. Conceptually, you can think of this as adding an [Authorize] attribute by default to every single Controller and Razor Page ONLY WHEN no other attribute is specified on a Controller or Razor Page like [AllowAnonymous] or [Authorize(PolicyName="PolicyName")]).

Link: https://scottsauber.com/2020/01/20/globally-require-authenticated-users-by-default-using-fallback-policies-in-asp-net-core/

Playwright

Playwright is a Node library to automate the Chromium, WebKit and Firefox browsers. This includes support for the new Microsoft Edge browser, which is based on Chromium.

Link: https://github.com/microsoft/playwright/blob/master/README.md

The F# Path to Relaxation – and what it means for .NET

After all the talk this week about .NET and it’s liveliness, I recommend watching this talk, re: memetic independence

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTbyKsw7uIU

Follow @CodeOpinion on Twitter

Enjoy this post? Subscribe!

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter and stay tuned.

Roundup #61: .NET Core 3.1, AWS CDK, JetBrains Space, How Buildings Learn

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Follow @CodeOpinion on Twitter

Announcing .NET Core 3.1

We’re excited to announce the release of .NET Core 3.1. It’s really just a small set of fixes and refinements over .NET Core 3.0, which we released just over two months ago. The most important feature is that .NET Core 3.1 is an long-term supported (LTS) release and will be supported for three years. As we’ve done in the past, we wanted to take our time before releasing the next LTS release. The extra two months (after .NET Core 3.0) allowed us to select and implement the right set of improvements over what was already a very stable base. .NET Core 3.1 is now ready to be used wherever your imagination or business need takes it.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/announcing-net-core-3-1/

AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) – Java and .NET are Now Generally Available

Today, we are happy to announce that Java and .NET support inside the AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) is now generally available. The AWS CDK is an open-source software development framework to model and provision your cloud application resources through AWS CloudFormationAWS CDK also offers support for TypeScript and Python.

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/aws-cloud-development-kit-cdk-java-and-net-are-now-generally-available/

JetBrains: Welcome to Space!

Today at KotlinConf, we announced our brand new product Space, and we have already opened the Early Access Program.

Space is an integrated team environment that provides teams and organizations with the tools they need to collaborate effectively and efficiently. It has Git-based Version Control, Code Review, Automation (CI/CD) based on Kotlin Scripting, Package Repositories, Planning tools, Issue Tracker, Chats, Blogs, Meetings, and Team Directory, among other features.

Link: https://blog.jetbrains.com/blog/2019/12/05/welcome-to-space/

How Buildings Learn

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvEqfg2sIH0

Follow @CodeOpinion on Twitter

Enjoy this post? Subscribe!

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter and stay tuned.

Roundup #60: gRPC vs HTTP APIs, .NET Perception, Rider, WebWindow

Here are the things that caught my eye recently in .NET.  I’d love to hear what you found most interesting this week.  Let me know in the comments or on Twitter.

Follow @CodeOpinion on Twitter

gRPC vs HTTP APIs

ASP.NET Core now enables developers to build gRPC services. gRPC is an opinionated contract-first remote procedure call framework, with a focus on performance and developer productivity. gRPC integrates with ASP.NET Core 3.0, so you can use your existing ASP.NET Core logging, configuration, authentication patterns to build new gRPC services.

Link: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/aspnet/grpc-vs-http-apis/

Perception of .NET

https://twitter.com/joepetrakovich/status/1195941775342493696

I thought this thread was fascinating. Very interesting to read some of the responses.

Link: https://twitter.com/joepetrakovich/status/1195941775342493696

Rider with Kirill Skrygan

In this episode I interviewed Kirill about Rider and ReSharper from JetBrains. Some of you may know Kirill from his work on both the ReShrarper and Rider projects, and some of his work on the JetBrains open source projects.

Link: https://dotnetcore.show/episode-38-rider-with-kirill-skyrgan/

Meet WebWindow, a cross-platform webview library for .NET Core

My last post investigated ways to build a .NET Core desktop/console app with a web-rendered UI without bringing in the full weight of Electron. This seems to have interested a lot of people, so I decided to upgrade it to newer technologies and add cross-platform support.

The result is a little NuGet package called WebWindow that you can add to any .NET Core console app. It can open a native OS window (Windows/Mac/Linux) containing web-based UI, without your app having to bundle either Node or Chromium.

I’ve also decoupled it from Blazor. You can now host any kind of web UI inside the window. The repo contains a sample that uses Vue.js, and another that uses Blazor.

Link: https://blog.stevensanderson.com/2019/11/18/2019-11-18-webwindow-a-cross-platform-webview-for-dotnet-core/

Follow @CodeOpinion on Twitter

Enjoy this post? Subscribe!

Subscribe to our weekly Newsletter and stay tuned.